The End of the Web, Search, and Computer as We Know It

The End of the Web, Search, and Com­puter as We Know It:

parisle­mon:

I think about what constantly-flowing infor­ma­tion means for blog­ging. In some ways this is Twit­ter, Insta­gram, Tum­blr, etc. But what if some­one started a stand-alone blog that wasn’t a series of posts, but rather a con­tin­u­ous stream of blurbs, almost like chat. For exam­ple: “I just heard…” or “Microsoft launch­ing this is stu­pid, here’s why…” — things like that. More like an always-on live blog, I guess.

It’s sort of strange to me that blogs are still based around the idea of fully-formed arti­cles of old. This works well for some con­tent, but I don’t see why it has to be that way for all con­tent. The real-time com­mu­ni­ca­tion aspect of the web should be uti­lized more, espe­cially in a mobile world.

Peo­ple aren’t going to want to sit on one page all day, espe­cially if there’s noth­ing new com­ing in for a bit. But push noti­fi­ca­tions could alle­vi­ate this as could Twit­ter as a noti­fi­ca­tion layer. And with mul­ti­ple peo­ple on “shift” doing updates, there could always be fresh con­tent, com­ing in real time.

Just think­ing out loud here.

Good out loud think­ing from MG about where blogging’s going. I’ve real­ized for while now that I’m much more likely to use Twit­ter and Tum­blr to share small snip­pets that aren’t worth a fully-formed post. What I’ve also real­ized is that I’m more likely to add com­men­tary to that link share (as I’m doing now) so that it effec­tively becomes a blog post.

Because of this I’m seri­ously con­sid­er­ing archiv­ing my almost ten year old blog (care­fully pre­serv­ing com­ment threads if at a pos­si­ble) and installing my Tum­blr on the Quak​er​Ran​ter​.org domain.

  • http://www.facebook.com/jon.watts.personal Jon Watts

    Inter­est­ing… do you mean that there is no longer a place for the “fully-formed arti­cle of old”?

    • http://www.martinkelley.com/ Mar­tin Kelley

      No, just that it’s not nec­es­sar­ily most of the social con­tent I pro­duce. I do a lot of cura­tion (but then always have since my first proto-blog in 1997) and it’s the find­ing, shar­ing and com­ment­ing that is the “value added” por­tion of my sharing.

      And look at this very piece: linked to by Simon S-L, com­mented on by you: this, yet it is a trainj com­ment from Flip­board, posted to Tum­blr and then auto­mat­i­cally reblogged via an Ifttt recipe (https://​ifttt​.com/​m​y​r​e​c​i​p​e​s​/​p​e​r​s​o​n​a​l​/​2​7​5​7​294) to this Word­Press site. Really, why not just admit that Tumblr’s my blog and moth­ball the Word­Press as an archive?