Silence or Stillness as a Spiritual Discipline

Silence or Still­ness as a Spir­i­tual Dis­ci­pline. Doug Ben­nett on still worship:

While gath­er­ing in still­ness didn’t come eas­ily to me as a spir­i­tual prac­tice, I found it more sat­is­fy­ing than going to a con­ven­tional wor­ship ser­vice. Occa­sion­ally going to a Quaker meet­ing I would hear an unplanned mes­sage that was truly amaz­ing: fresh, clear, ener­gized, pierc­ing. Those moments were not made less potent for me by the more numer­ous ordi­nary mes­sages I also heard in Meetings.

Liberal vs radical social witness

Lib­eral vs rad­i­cal social wit­ness. Another install­ment from Steven Davison’s Quaker-pocalypse series:

Lib­eral social action tends to be respect­ful, too, if not even a bit def­er­en­tial. The lib­eral impulse in wit­ness and out­reach seeks not to turn away a seeker who might be made uncom­fort­able by un-reasonable words and actions, or to seem to dis­re­spect the peo­ple with whom we dis­agree. This is not rad­i­cal, and I ques­tion whether it is the path to renewal.

Reorganizing the meeting organizational chart

Reor­ga­niz­ing the meet­ing orga­ni­za­tional chart. Jnana Hodson:

Bring­ing this per­spec­tive home, as some of us have looked at the actual work of Dover Meet­ing, we’ve seen that our com­mit­tees might be regrouped into four or five larger bod­ies that might not have to be defined as com­mit­tees. Call them min­istries, work­ing groups, teams, “minis” for “mini-meetings/ministries,” or what­ever, they could be gath­ered around a set of con­cerns and have a coor­di­na­tor or care­taker instead of a clerk.

Ezra Klein on Vox’s theory of aggregation

Ezra Klein on Vox’s the­ory of aggre­ga­tion:

I must admit I’m not the biggest fan of Vox. But I like hear­ing Klein explain how they aggregate.

Often­times aggre­ga­tion hap­pens less pub­licly, too: all reporters, all the time, are writ­ing arti­cles informed by other people’s work, ideas, and the­o­ries. Most all intel­lec­tual endeav­ors end up being a pas­tiche of good points made by peo­ple who came before you — if you’re lucky, you can add a lit­tle bit to the whole, and help those who come after.

Much of my work has been aggre­ga­tion and I agree that done right–and with clear attributions–it can help grow not just a media pub­li­ca­tion but a small media ecosystem.

David Zarembka: Kenya’s Garissa Attack Wasn’t Just a Tragedy. It Was Blowback

David Zarem­bka: Kenya’s Garissa Attack Wasn’t Just a Tragedy. It Was Blow­back:

The Quaker coor­di­na­tor of the local Friends Peace Teams gives his­tor­i­cal con­text behind the recent attacks in Kenya. Like most con­tem­po­rary insur­gen­cies, it’s not quite the ran­dom act it first appears to be. Also, like most con­tem­po­rary acts of ter­ror, reli­gion is only a part of the equa­tion: U.S. poli­cies to destablize unfriendly gov­ern­ments and look the other way at atroc­i­ties by friendly gov­ern­ments also help cre­ate this toxic stew.

There’s con­sid­er­able eth­nic hos­til­ity and dis­crim­i­na­tion against Soma­lis in Kenya, includ­ing a dark his­tory of pogroms and mass mur­ders by Kenyan author­i­ties. All this has led to fer­tile recruit­ment by al-Shabaab among the Soma­lis in Kenya.

Ezra Klein on Vox’s theory of aggregation

Ezra Klein on Vox’s the­ory of aggre­ga­tion I must admit I’m not the biggest fan of Vox. But I like hear­ing Klein explain how they aggregate.

Often­times aggre­ga­tion hap­pens less pub­licly, too: all reporters, all the time, are writ­ing arti­cles informed by other people’s work, ideas, and the­o­ries. Most all intel­lec­tual endeav­ors end up being a pas­tiche of good points made by peo­ple who came before you — if you’re lucky, you can add a lit­tle bit to the whole, and help those who come after.

Much of my work has been aggre­ga­tion and I agree that done right–and with clear attributions–it can help grow not just a media pub­li­ca­tion but a small media ecosystem.

David Zarembka: Kenya’s Garissa Attack Wasn’t Just a Tragedy. It Was Blowback

David Zarem­bka: Kenya’s Garissa Attack Wasn’t Just a Tragedy. It Was Blow­back The Quaker coor­di­na­tor of the local Friends Peace Teams gives his­tor­i­cal con­text behind the recent attacks in Kenya. Like most con­tem­po­rary insur­gen­cies, it’s far less of a ran­dom act when you look at the con­di­tions that cre­ated the attack­ers. Also, like most con­tem­po­rary acts of ter­ror, reli­gion is only a part of the equa­tion: U.S. poli­cies to destablize unfriendly gov­ern­ments and eth­nic groups also help cre­ate this toxic stew.

There’s con­sid­er­able eth­nic hos­til­ity and dis­crim­i­na­tion against Soma­lis in Kenya, includ­ing a dark his­tory of pogroms and mass mur­ders by Kenyan author­i­ties. All this has led to fer­tile recruit­ment by al-Shabaab among the Soma­lis in Kenya.